Download American Cinema of the 1910s: Themes and Variations (The by Charlie Keil, Ben Singer PDF

By Charlie Keil, Ben Singer

It used to be throughout the youngsters that filmmaking really got here into its personal. Studios migrated to the West Coast, constructing a connection among moviemaking and the exoticism of Hollywood. The essays in American Cinema of the 1910s discover the quick advancements of the last decade that begun with D. W. Griffith s unmatched one-reelers. through mid-decade, multi-reel characteristic motion pictures have been profoundly reshaping the and deluxe theaters have been outfitted to draw the broadest attainable viewers. Stars like Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and Douglas Fairbanks grew to become very important and corporations begun writing high-profile contracts to safe them. With the outbreak of global struggle I, the political, fiscal, and business basis used to be laid for American cinema's international dominance. via the top of the last decade, filmmaking had develop into a real undefined, whole with vertical integration, effective specialization and standardization of practices, and self-regulatory businesses.
Some of the flicks mentioned during this quantity are: The Lonedale Operator, site visitors in Souls, The Perils of Pauline, The start of a kingdom, The Cheat, Intolerance, and female and male.

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American Cinema of the 1910s: Themes and Variations (The Screen Decades Series)

It used to be in the course of the children that filmmaking really got here into its personal. Studios migrated to the West Coast, constructing a connection among moviemaking and the exoticism of Hollywood. The essays in American Cinema of the 1910s discover the fast advancements of the last decade that all started with D. W. Griffith s unmatched one-reelers.

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Attention should be called,” wrote the New York Dramatic Mirror, “to a few remarkable scenes—one of them the destruction of Alessandro’s village, which we see with the poor Indian from a mountain top looking down into a valley a mile or more away. The burning huts, the hurrying people and the wagons of the whites are clearly visible, though they appear but as mere specks in the distance” (Pratt 84). As is not unusual among the year’s films, the female lead is the emotional pillar, and Ramona survives after her husband is driven mad and murdered.

Nevertheless, the very fact that such a salary trajectory was even possible in the 1910s demands attention. It is important to stress that the story of Pickford’s skyrocketing income is not just an early version of the kind of narrative we are familiar with today about, say, a waitress earning minimum wage in Los Angeles getting discovered and catapulting onto the Hollywood A-list. The Pickford phenomenon was utterly unheard of, with no precedent. Indeed, if it merited a newspaper article in 1913 when Pickford was making a jawdropping $200 a week, one can only imagine how mind-boggling it must have been just five years later when she was making 200 times that much.

Compared to 1909, editing tempos are slightly faster, cameras move slightly closer to the actors, who are more restrained, and intertitles are slightly more frequent (Keil, Early 62, 145). George O. Nichols as “Officer Quinn” manages to convey a complex series of emotions primarily through facial expression—when he puzzles out just where he might have previously seen the girl. Previously the camera was seldom close enough to the actors to allow for such subtlety. To our eyes, the typical framing of actors this year—with two-thirds of their bodies usually in view—still seems distant, but the camera was now close enough for audiences to read actors’ lips, as is indirectly evident from a December front-page story in the New York Times headlined “Object to Film Profanity”: “Deaf mutes are complaining against the use of profane and indecent expressions by players in moving picture films .

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